John Rudel, a local artist and teacher at Virginia Wesleyan College sandblasted photographic images of baseball players in action onto the windscreens at Harbor Park Station.

The large scale of the figures and their organic curvilinear shapes are a striking visual contrast from the surrounding hard grid of the aluminum station structure. By isolating the dramatic movements of the players in action Rudel asks the viewer to consider the general beauty and potential of the human act of throwing a baseball.

John Rudel was one of approximately a dozen artists whose artwork was selected for installation in the light rail stations as part of the City of Norfolk’s 1% public art program. The artists were honored at a public dedication ceremony. Mayor Paul Fraim was among the speakers who lauded their efforts and emphasized the importance of public art in creating a sense of community. Rudel was one of several artists who also spoke at the ceremony.
Rudel states “A very meaningful feedback loop is developed when artists who inhabit a region are invited to become culture creators within that region. That’s exactly what the public art program is facilitating. Being selected to create the glass imagery for Harbor Park station has meant a lot to me and I hope that it is enjoyed by many.”

Seated along the Elizabeth River, Harbor Park stadium is used primarily for baseball and is home to the Norfolk Tides Minor League Baseball team. In fact, the park was once rated the best minor league stadium by Baseball America and can seat 11,856 people!
Read entire article from Va.Wesleyan here

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